Aortic Stenosis

By: Dr. Thourani
Date: Jun 7, 2016

Aortic stenosis and regurgitation may occur with age, often in those older than 70. However, in patients with other heart conditions, aortic stenosis or regurgitation can occur much earlier.

Aortic Stenosis Symptoms

Aortic stenosis and regurgitation may be mild and not produce symptoms. However, over time, the aortic valve may become narrower, resulting in a variety of symptoms including:

  • Fainting
  • Weakness or chest pain (often increasing with activity)
  • Palpitations (rapid, noticeable heart beats)
  • Chronic heart failure
  • Blood clots to the brain (stroke), intestines, kidneys, or other areas
  • High blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs (pulmonary hypertension)

Valve Treatment

Physicians at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center offer a variety of treatment options for patients with severe aortic stenosis. Physicians at Emory perform transcatheter aortic valve replacement for inoperable patients, high risk patients, as well as medium risk patients. Minimally invasive surgical aortic valve replacement can be done in those who are low-risk patients.

The results of aortic valve replacement are often excellent. During transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), Emory interventional cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons place a new valve inside the heart without stopping the heart or opening the chest. Patients often recover more quickly from this minimally invasive approach.

Schedule your appointment today.

About Dr. Thourani

Dr. Thourani has been heavily involved in the research for structural heart and with the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement trials. Other areas of focus are: valve disease, percutaneous and minimally invasive valve applications, biomedical engineering for treatment of new valve prosthesis and techniques, myocardial protection, coronary artery disease. Dr. Thourani is the Professor of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Emory Hospital Midtown, and the Co-Director of the Emory Structural Heart and Valve Center.


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